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LESSON FOUR

Meeting Plant Needs 4-6

Altering Your pH:

If you find that your pH is too alkaline (too high), you can increase acidity (lower pH) by adding white vinegar, sulfuric acid or "pH-Down"

If you find that your pH is too acidic (too low), you can increase alkalinity (raise pH) by adding baking soda or "pH-Up."

When adjusting your pH, it is important to add small amounts, measuring as you go, until you know exactly how much to add per gallon of water to reach the desired level.

Following are target pH ranges for various garden crops:

bulletBeans 5.8-6.2 
bullet Cabbage 6.3-6.5 
bullet Cucumbers 5.7-6.2 
bullet Eggplant 5.7-5.9 
bullet Lettuce 5.7-6.2 
bullet Melons 5.4-5.6 
bullet Peas 6.3-6.5 
bullet Peppers 5.8-6.2 
bullet Radishes 5.8-6.2 
bullet Strawberries 5.8-6.2 
bullet Tomatoes 5.8-6.0

If you plan to grow a variety of crops, some compromise will be necessary. Again, growing plants with like needs together will yield the best results.

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