Search Hydroponics Online:
New Immigration Laws Pave the way for Hydroponic Farming
Powdery and Downy Mildew
Building your own Indoor Grow Room part 2
Building your own Indoor Grow Room part 1
The Benefits of Chelated Micro-nutrients
Is the pH really that important?
Getting Bigger Yields From your Hydroponic Plants
Tips for getting the most out of your nutrients
Millions of dollars lost in hydroponic tomato plant sabotage
Growing Hydroponic Raspberries, part 2
The three main challenges of the hydroponic farmer
Newbie to this forum and to hydroponics
Solution recipe for radishes
bibb lettuce question
My first indoor aeroponic setup
Aquaponic system ph level and nutrients
Can maincrop potatoes grow in soil-less environment?
Selling barely used 10and 8 ton ventilation systems & more
First Timer to Hydrophonics
need help with Peace Lily
NFT uneven growth
Cyanobacteria, tea not working, PLEASE HELP!
Ebb and Flow question
Seed germination questions
Green house. Nft and dutch buckets
New here
New guy, strawberry tower
It's Cyanobacteria! Questions about tea!
life of lettuce in dwc question
Northern lights bloom box
hydroponicsonline.com

Lesson Nine

Biological Pest Control 9-1 

Lesson Nine - Biological Pest Control


Many gardeners and consumers are concerned with the quality, purity and safety of the food
they eat. With soils becoming tainted and water sources polluted, it is a valid concern. In 
the farming industry, use of pesticides and herbicides has grown for years as farmers have 
attempted to control the pests and weeds that challenge their crops.

With consumers demanding safer produce, there has recently been an active movement away
from excessive pesticide use. One way to achieve this is by the use of Biological pest con-
trols rather than chemical pest controls. Biological controls consist of insects, mites and mi-
cro-organisms which, as natural enemies, keep pests under control.

Many commercial hydroponic growers who produce their crops within a controlled environ-
ment greenhouse exclusively use biological controls for problem pests. When bringing bio-
logical controls or beneficial insects into the greenhouse a natural balance can be achieved.
It is possible to control pests in an open field with biological means but it is not as effective 
as within a greenhouse or other closed environment.

Virtually all insects have a predator or enemy and that is what makes biological control
work. There are insectaries (facilities that raise insects) throughout the US and Worldwide 
that breed and sell beneficial insects. Beneficials are shipped as eggs, larvae or adults and 
are usually sent overnight to the user who quickly distributes them to the problem areas.

In the world of beneficial insects, there are predators and parasites.
Predators will actually consume the pest insect. A lacewing is a good
example of a predator. Lacewings are welcomed in most gardens be-
cause they are know for their voracious appetite and broad diet of various insects.
 


Leaf Miner
Pest Insect

A parasite is an insect that lays its eggs within the egg sack of another insect, displacing or 
consuming the eggs that were there. The Larvae that emerge from the egg sack are those of 
the parasite, not it's victim.

HOME / LAST PAGE / NEXT PAGE